An interview with Matthew Simonton, author of Classical Greek Oligarchy: a Political History

Matt, thank you for taking the time to talk to us about your book, Classical Greek Oligarchy: a Political History, which has a wide frame of reference. You not only cite a very wide range of ancient authors and sources, you also bring in modern political theorists and examples from modern political situations to support your analysis. But then you seem to have studied several different disciplines at university; not just classics and ancient history but modern politics and political theory, and theatre too. Can you tell us a little about yourself and how you made these choices? Do you think perhaps the American university system gives more freedom to cross boundaries between academic disciplines than a British university would normally do?

I’ve always been interested in the “big picture” concerning politics and society. As an undergraduate, despite being a Classics major, I think it’s fair to say I was obsessed with political philosophy and political theory, and read them every chance I got.

Read moreAn interview with Matthew Simonton, author of Classical Greek Oligarchy: a Political History

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Matthew Simonton

An excerpt from Matthew Simonton’s entry, Classical Greek Oligarchy: a Political History

At least since the time of the poet Pindar in the mid-fifth century BCE, the ancient Greeks understood that  regimes could be classed according to rule by the one, the few, or the many. Twenty-five centuries later, if one were to press Classical historians on how much attention they have paid to each type, they might respond, with some sheepishness, that two out of three ain’t bad.

Read moreAn excerpt from Matthew Simonton’s entry, Classical Greek Oligarchy: a Political History

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An interview with Peter Rhodes and Robin Osborne, authors of Greek Historical Inscriptions, 478-404 BC

Professor Rhodes, Professor Osborne, thank you for taking the time to answer a few questions about your book, Greek Historical Inscriptions 478-404 BC. This is not your first collaboration; the companion volume, Greek Historical Inscriptions 404-323 BC, was published ten years ago. How did you approach writing these two books? Do you work separately on … Read moreAn interview with Peter Rhodes and Robin Osborne, authors of Greek Historical Inscriptions, 478-404 BC

An excerpt from Robin Osborne and Peter Rhodes’s entry, Greek Historical Inscriptions 478-404 BC

Prof Robin Osborne
Prof Robin Osborne
Prof P J Rhodes
Prof P J Rhodes

127

Elis honours a Spartan and a Euboean, c.450

A bronze tablet in the shape of a flat ring, found at Olympia and now in the museum there. Phot. Kyrielis (ed.), Olympia, 1875–2000, p. 360 Abb. 1.

Read moreAn excerpt from Robin Osborne and Peter Rhodes’s entry, Greek Historical Inscriptions 478-404 BC

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2018 Runciman Book Prize: short list announced

Press Release – 21st April 2018

2018 RUNCIMAN BOOK PRIZE: SHORT LIST ANNOUNCED


The Anglo-Hellenic League

(Registered Charity No. 278892)
The Hellenic Centre, 16/18 Paddington Street, London W1U 5AS
Email: info@anglohellenicleague.org
President and Chief Patron HRH Prince Michael of Kent GCVO
Joint Patrons HE The Greek Ambassador to the Court of St James’s
HBM Ambassador to Greece
Chairman Gerald Cadogan MA FSA

The short list for the 2018 Runciman Award was announced today by the Anglo-Hellenic League on behalf of the judges.

The books from which the winner will be selected are:

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