Colm Toibin interview

A few words from Colm Tóibín

Following the announcement that Matthew Simonton and Colm Tóibín are joint winners of this year’s Runciman Award, we caught up with Mr Tóibín and asked him a few questions about his book, House of Names. Thank you for taking the time to talk to us about House of Names. Can we start by asking how your interest … Read moreA few words from Colm Tóibín

Carolyn Higbie interview

An interview with Carolyn Higbie, author of Collectors, Scholars, and Forgers in the Ancient World: Object Lessons

Carolyn, thank you for taking the time to answer a few questions about your book. Before we turn to Collectors, Scholars, and Forgers in the Ancient World: Object Lessons, I’d like to ask about your background. You studied at Princeton and at Oxford, and spent some of your school years in Britain as well as in the … Read moreAn interview with Carolyn Higbie, author of Collectors, Scholars, and Forgers in the Ancient World: Object Lessons

An interview with Rachel Kousser, author of The Afterlives of Greek Sculpture: Interaction, Transformation, and Destruction

Rachel, thank you for taking the time to talk to us about your book, The Afterlives of Greek Sculpture: Interaction, Transformation, and Destruction. The ‘afterlives’ in the title of your book are mainly the things that were done to statues to harm or desecrate them, but you give us a wonderful picture of what statues … Read moreAn interview with Rachel Kousser, author of The Afterlives of Greek Sculpture: Interaction, Transformation, and Destruction

Rachel Kousser

An excerpt from The Afterlives of Greek Sculpture: Interaction, Transformation, and Destruction by Rachel Kousser

In the five centuries between the Persian wars and the death of Cleopatra, the Greeks not only created some of the ancient world’s best known monumental sculptures, but also gave them complex and at times contentious afterlives. As visual and written sources attest, the Greeks washed, perfumed, and polished statues; they poured libations upon them … Read moreAn excerpt from The Afterlives of Greek Sculpture: Interaction, Transformation, and Destruction by Rachel Kousser

An interview with Matthew Simonton, author of Classical Greek Oligarchy: a Political History

Matt, thank you for taking the time to talk to us about your book, Classical Greek Oligarchy: a Political History, which has a wide frame of reference. You not only cite a very wide range of ancient authors and sources, you also bring in modern political theorists and examples from modern political situations to support your analysis. But then you seem to have studied several different disciplines at university; not just classics and ancient history but modern politics and political theory, and theatre too. Can you tell us a little about yourself and how you made these choices? Do you think perhaps the American university system gives more freedom to cross boundaries between academic disciplines than a British university would normally do?

I’ve always been interested in the “big picture” concerning politics and society. As an undergraduate, despite being a Classics major, I think it’s fair to say I was obsessed with political philosophy and political theory, and read them every chance I got.

Read moreAn interview with Matthew Simonton, author of Classical Greek Oligarchy: a Political History

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