Rachel Kousser

An excerpt from The Afterlives of Greek Sculpture: Interaction, Transformation, and Destruction by Rachel Kousser

In the five centuries between the Persian wars and the death of Cleopatra, the Greeks not only created some of the ancient world’s best known monumental sculptures, but also gave them complex and at times contentious afterlives. As visual and written sources attest, the Greeks washed, perfumed, and polished statues; they poured libations upon them … Read moreAn excerpt from The Afterlives of Greek Sculpture: Interaction, Transformation, and Destruction by Rachel Kousser

Bettany Hughes

An excerpt from Bettany Hughes’s entry, Istanbul: a Tale of Three Cities

INTRODUCTION

Though all other cities have their periods of government and are subject
to the decays of time, Constantinople alone seems to claim a kind of
immortality and will continue to be a city as long as humanity shall live
either to inhabit or rebuild it. Pierre Gilles, ad 1550

On 4 February 1939 the BBC transmitted an audio-recording of W. B. Yeats’s poem ‘Sailing to Byzantium’. This was the broadcaster’s tribute to the firebrand Irishman who had died seven days before. Crackling and hissing, the clipped, RP Queen’s English hangs somewhere between the sublime and the sinister, the recording itself a broken reminder of what the great city of Byzantium had and has become.

Read moreAn excerpt from Bettany Hughes’s entry, Istanbul: a Tale of Three Cities

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Matthew Simonton

An excerpt from Matthew Simonton’s entry, Classical Greek Oligarchy: a Political History

At least since the time of the poet Pindar in the mid-fifth century BCE, the ancient Greeks understood that  regimes could be classed according to rule by the one, the few, or the many. Twenty-five centuries later, if one were to press Classical historians on how much attention they have paid to each type, they might respond, with some sheepishness, that two out of three ain’t bad.

Read moreAn excerpt from Matthew Simonton’s entry, Classical Greek Oligarchy: a Political History

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An excerpt from Robin Osborne and Peter Rhodes’s entry, Greek Historical Inscriptions 478-404 BC

Prof Robin Osborne
Prof Robin Osborne
Prof P J Rhodes
Prof P J Rhodes

127

Elis honours a Spartan and a Euboean, c.450

A bronze tablet in the shape of a flat ring, found at Olympia and now in the museum there. Phot. Kyrielis (ed.), Olympia, 1875–2000, p. 360 Abb. 1.

Read moreAn excerpt from Robin Osborne and Peter Rhodes’s entry, Greek Historical Inscriptions 478-404 BC

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